Good Grief! : Celebrating Peanuts #6: Schroeder

One of the most common names for a municipal theater is “Orpheum” derived from the Greek mythological figure, Orpheus, who was legendary for his music. Tales of antiquity tell of his great love, Eurydice and how he went down to the Underworld to get her back from Hades, and how his song had so bewitched the Dark Lord and his queen Persephone that they relented, allowing him to have his bride, on one condition. He was never to look back, lest she fade away. He disobeyed, losing his wife until he joined her in the underworld, permanently.

In fact aside from the famous Apollo theater in New York, it isn’t common for a theater or music hall to be named for a fictional character. Usually, they are named after a great local

Schroeder

patron of the arts, or just for the city itself. Even on college campuses, the music hall is named for its donors. Thus, in 2014, it came as a big surprise to many that Sonoma State University in Northern California would name one of their music halls after a comic strip character.

As the Los Angeles Times reported,

“Schroeder Hall — a modest, 250-seat venue located at the public university’s Green Music Center — will have its opening later this month. The hall is named in honor of the “Peanuts” character Schroeder, the precocious boy who enjoys playing the music of Ludwig van Beethoven on his toy piano. A university spokeswoman said that the hall’s naming was a way of recognizing Jean Schulz, wife of the late “Peanuts” cartoonist Charles Schulz. Jean Schulz has been a supporter and donor to the Green Music Center for years…An inaugural performance at Schroeder Hall is scheduled for Aug. 22. The private event, featuring pianist David Benoit, will honor Jean Schulz with a program titled “Tribute to Charlie Brown.””

So, why not name the hall after Jean Schulz? Why name it for her husband’s fictional creation. After all there are no music halls named for Mickey Mouse, Bugs Bunny, Batman, Spider-Man, Popeye, Garfield, Dennis the Menace or any other cartoon and comic book characters. However, apart from the classic Bugs Bunny cartoon “What’s Opera, Doc” few fictional characters have been able to give readers and viewers an education in classical music. Even before most kids take a music appreciation class in school, they already know who Beethoven is and some of his most famous compositions, thanks to Schroeder.

When he first debuted in the comics, Schroeder was not the child prodigy we know him today. In his debut strip, in May of 1951 neighbor girl patty was excited to introduce Charlie Brown to the new kid, Schroeder. When Charlie saw Schroeder was just a baby, Charlie was intimidated, saying he didn’t know what to do around “children.”By 1952, he was already a toddler, and in a strip from September 24, of that year, Charlie Brown decided to introduce his little friend to the piano, saying,

“See how easy it is, Schroeder?  The piano is a beautiful instrument if played properly…Now, let’s hear you play, huh, Schroeder?”

Then Schroeder proceeded to not only play the piano, but played a full classical arrangement on the instrument, showing up Charlie Brown. The other kids were impressed, and a brief recurring gag became Charlie trying to do duets witch Schroeder on piano and Charlie on the cigar box banjo. They never ended well, as Charlie learned not only do no musical arrangements exist for such a duo, but Schroeder, and the rest of the gang, hated hearing the Cigar Box Banjo.

Schroeder would catch up in age to Charlie, and develop an affection for only one composer: Ludwig Van Beethoven. Initially Schulz wanted Brahms to be the composer of focus as that had been his personal favorite. However, Schulz found that Beethoven was simply funnier on the page. And thus began one of the strips key features, the little boy, playing away at some of the world’s greatest music on a toy piano.

Schulz would say of Schroeder,

“I kind of like Schroeder. He’s fairly down to earth, but he has his problems too. He has to play on the painted black piano keys, and he thinks Beethoven was the first President of the United States.”

This was best demonstrated in the special You’re Not Elected, Charlie Brown. Schroeder is selected to present Linus as potential candidate for student body president to the electorate ( which in this case is the students of their elementary school). His speech, actually doesn’t mention a word about Linus, as he says,

“The candidate whose name I am presenting to the electorate possesses the same unique combination of qualities as those possessed by Beethoven, the greatest of all composers. That wonderful pianist, and that tower of strength. Linus is sort of like that, too.”

The creation of Schroeder came from two sources. One was from Schulz’ daughter Meredith, who loved to play her toy piano. Schulz thought the idea of a child playing an instrument like that was cute and wanted to incorporate it into his strip. As for the young virtuosos name, Schulz said in an interview that,

“Schroeder was named after a young boy with whom I used to caddy at Highland Park golf course in St. Paul. I don’t recall ever knowing his first name, but just ‘Schroeder’ seemed right for the character in the script, even before he became the great musician he now is.”

Whether by accident or design the fact he is known by only one name only makes him like the great composers like Bach, Beethoven, Haydn, Dvorak,  Mozart, Strauss, Sousa,Handel, and Tchaikovsky, who are now referred to only by their surnames. Due to the fact he is not as neurotic as Charlie, or philosophical as Linus, Schroeder is easily dismissed as a simple side character with a gimmick due to his always being at his piano. However, James C. Kauffman sees something different in the character in The Charlie Brown Theory of Personality for Psychology Today, actually finding his hard work and dedication admirable. As he notes,

“Charlie Brown, Linus, Snoopy, and even Lucy are fairly well-developed characters. Schroeder is equally (perhaps more) lovable, but most casual readers know him for one thing: his piano playing. Yes, Lucy has a crush on him, but that’s about her – he will have none of it. He is always practicing. Disciplined and focused on his passion for classical music, one can imagine him setting his alarm clock for seven a.m. on weekends to try Autumn Sonata one more time. His one other preferred activity is playing catcher for the baseball team – again, the sturdy, reliable director of the action on the field. Schroeder would offer to help you move and show up ten minutes early.”

Through his obsession, Peanuts became one of the rare strips to feature the actual notes that a character was playing visualized above their heads while playing the piano. More importantly, Schulz drew the actual measures from a Beethoven symphony anytime Schroeder was at the piano. As Jean Schulz noted in a Q and A session,

“When he drew the musical notes for Schroeder, he always used actual musical notes, and the first time he did that somebody wrote him and said ‘I can’t believe you put a little bit of Beethoven’s something symphony’ (it wasn’t always Beethoven, there were a lot of musical strips). He realized that when that person wrote to him, people recognized and appreciated authenticity and you are writing for them. You are writing those Beethoven notes in your silly little comic strip for that person who is a musical expert. Appreciating your audience is important. It shows respect for them.”

Schroeder’s love for music and the piano became the subject of one of the stories long running gags where Lucy would frequently lean against his piano and listen to him play and talk about their possible future together. The talks can range from simply dating, to him giving her gifts to marriage. Once when asked if he would send her flowers upon being ordered, Schroeder told her he’d rather go to jail. In another strip was also not afraid to tell her, when asking why he never gave her presents that he thoughts she was “loud, mean,  rude, and overbearing.”

In another strip around Christmas time, she asked him why there was no mistletoe in his house, and he responded,

“When I saw you coming, I took it down..then I threw it in the trash burner, and I burned it, and I stood there, watching it burn to make sure it was destroyed, and it was! I destroyed it completely!!”

Yet, overall, until he reached his limit with her and showed her away, he’d let her go on with talking to him, even when she’d go off on  the hypotheticals about them possibly being married, such as one strip where she talked about something so mundane as saucepans , which befuddled him as she said,

“What if you and I got married someday, Schroeder? And what if we were so poor that you had to sell your piano so we could buy saucepans?… Sure, you wouldn’t expect me to keep house without a good set of saucepans, would you?”

Appropriately, while he may get annoyed with her, on some occasions he can even argue with her like an old married couple. In one strip, Lucy tells him that she is thinking of getting her ears pierced and asks what he thinks of that. Schroeder doesn’t even stop playing to respond, getting her with a snarky comment tshe never saw coming,

“You might as well. You pierced my ears a long time ago.”

In fact, Schroeder’s beloved piano became an unwitting third party in a very bizarre love triangle between Schroeder and Lucy. While in some instances of Peanuts triangles one person is oblivious to the affections of the other parties, as is the case of Charlie with Marcie and Peppermint Patty, or so annoyed to have people fighting over him like Linus claiming atop a roof to get away from Sally when a new girl named Truffles shows interest in the blanket carrying sage, this is an inanimate object. Schroeder’s Piano gives him the same sense of comfort and security as Linus’ blanket.

However, unlike other relationships, this can get borderline destructive. In one arc from January of 1969 began rather simply. At first Schroeder was just annoyed with Lucy leaning against his piano while he practiced and he, very bluntly told her to go away. She waxed philosophical about how much he’d miss her, and how empty his life would be. He told her simply “Try me” and she went away. The next two days she was seen kicking his piano, even comparing it to how a wife would hate a man’s golf-clubs, sports car, or bowling ball.

Finally, Schroeder came in one day on a strip from January 23, 1969 he comes in to find his piano missing. Lucy told him that she was tired of him not paying attention to her, and threw it up into a tree. In the following strip he reached the tree where Charlie Brown told him the awful truth. Lucy not only threw the piano into a tree, but it was the same dreaded kite eating tree that deprived Charlie Brown of many a kite. This led the anguished musician to cry out in the January 25, 1969 strip

“Help! This stupid tree is eating my piano! Call the Fire Department! Call the Rescue Squad!”

Linus came to see what was wrong, In learning what his sister did, Linus couldn’t help but state what a stupid thing it was to throw the piano up into the Kite Eating Tree. Lucy simply continued to justify her actions, saying,

“He never pays any attention to me! This will teach him a lesson…musicians are a peculiar lot…they always have to learn the hard way…”

While Snoopy would come to help try and get the piano out of the tree, his efforts were thwarted by the simple fact he is a beagle and cant’ climb a tree. The piano was destroyed and Schroeder was heartbroken. When Schroeder still failed to notice her and just mourned for his lost piano, Lucy grumbled that maybe she should have thrown Schroeder into the kite eating tree.

However, Schroeder would not be deterred from his music. In the concluding trip for the arc, from February 1st 1969, he is seen writing to a company to order a new one, and Charlie Brown asks if his old piano was insured,

“I’m ordering a new piano from the “Ace Piano Company” They have a special on..with the very toy piano you buy, you get a photograph of Joe Garagiola…How do you explain to an insurance company that your piano was eaten by a tree?”

This would not be the last time Lucy would try to destroy his piano. Aside from times where she would kick it or pound it, five years later, her jealousy of the instrument took a fever pitch in an arc that started on October 2, 1974. As Schroeder was playing, Lucy told him,

“This piano is too much competition for me…you know what I’m going to do? I’m going to snatch it way, and throw it in the sewer!..It’s woman against the piano! Woman is winning! Woman is Winning!”

Lucy succeeds in throwing the piano down the sewer and Charlie Brown even helps him try to get fish it out. When asking if Schroeder was able to find it in a strip from October 4, 1974 when asking if he found it, Schroeder simply replies by plinking at the key’s of the piano. Charlie urged Schroeder to hang onto the rope and the piano while he tried to help his friend out, and that was when it started to rain.

In the next strip from October 7, 1974, Schroeder calls out from the sewer, “Hey! Who turned on the water!” The aspiring musician couldn’t hold on to the rope and the piano so his instrument fell back down into the drain and based on how hard it was raining, began to head down river. The two boys tried to chase after it, and even enlisted Snoopy’s help, but the water was too cold for any of them.

A crestfallen Schroeder returns home only for Lucy to gloat, in a strip from October 10, 1974,

“Couldn’t find your piano, huh? Down the sewer and out into the river, huh? Oh, well, if you were to play it now, you’d probably just strike a sewer note! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! Ha! After you learn to love me, sweetie, you’ll appreciate my humor!

Not only did Schroeder not find it funny, he set about trying to replace Lucy’s competition. In the next day’s strip, Schroeder is seen on the phone, making a call that most musical instrument suppliers would probably find strange as he says,

“Hello, Ace Piano company? I want to order another piano..my first was eaten by a kite-eating tree…this last one was thrown down a sewer. ..yes, I want the same kind as before…”

Between her bad joke, and Lucy yelling over the phone to the Ace piano company to take their time on the order, it didn’t garner her on any of Schroeder’s good graces. This was something Lucy realized quickly, as she told Peppermint Patty in the arcs conclusion,

“The secret to love is removal of the competition. That’s all there is to it..remove the competition and the other person will love you! I threw Schroeder’s piano down the answer..now, it’s just a matter of time until he loves me…like maybe five hundred years!”

 

In the special, Happiness is a Warm Blanket Charlie Brown, it becomes clear that Schroeder learned from these two moments. Lucy charges into Schroeder’s room with a baseball bat and destroys not only Schroeder’s piano but his bust of Beethoven. This time, Schroeder doesn’t become despondent. Rather he retains his composure and goes to his closet that is fully loaded with replacement pianos and bust for such an occasion.

Thus between her constantly bothering him, and her occasionally acts of destruction, it’s pretty easy to see why Schroeder is so indifferent to her, and tries to ignore her. If even her own brother would rather spend Thanksgiving with Charlie Brown, Schroeder can’t be faulted for wanting an hour alone to play his piano in peace. However, despite Schroeder’s apparent indifference to her, deep down, he does seem to not mind her too much.

This is seen in the story arc that later inspired the special Is this Good-Bye, Charlie Brown? Throughout the story, Schroeder has not believed what Lucy and Linus were saying when they told the rest of the gang that they were moving to another city. The way she phrased it, it didn’t sound any different than any of her hypotheticals about a possible marriage together. Then, in a strip from May 16, 1966, he comes up to Charlie Brown who has just received Linus’ blanket as a goodbye present and has watched the Van Pelts leave for the last time.

Schroeder is dumbfounded when he learns it actually happens and tells Charlie Brown,

“But I thoughts he was just kidding! I didn’t think they’d really go! …But I don’t understand…I mean…I…”

A dejected Charlie Brown tells him just to go home and play his ol’ Beethoven, but when he returns to his piano, all Schroeder can do is stare at his instrument and sadly admit that he never got the chance to say goodbye. Later in a strip from May 18, 1969, as he is playing his piano a strange thing happens. All off a sudden he can no longer see his music, just Lucy’s face. Like it or not, as much as Schroeder would deny it Lucy had become the one thing an artist always seeks, his muse.

Typically the muse is seen as a figure who gives the artist the spark of inspiration in their pursuit. At first glance, Lucy doesn’t’ seem to do that. However, often times it is in the moments when she is frustrating him and goading him, that he plays his music with the most passion. He needs her to actually push him to be better, not so much because he wants that future where they are married, but because he wants to be the best musician. While his hero, Beethoven, may have been a bachelor, the song he is frequently seen playing, is Beethoven’s “Fur Elise”, a song the maestro composed for a woman he loved whose identity to this day still remains a mystery, and is simply known as his “immortal beloved.”

In fact, until she returns Schroeder is not unlike Beethoven in his letter, dated July 7, 1812, to this mysterious woman,

“Even when I am in bed my thoughts rush to you, my immortal beloved, now and then joyfully, then again sadly, waiting to know whether Fate will hear our prayer — To face life I must liv(e) altogether with you or never see you… Oh God, why must one be separated from her who is so dear. Yet my life in V[ienna] at present is a miserable life — Your love has made me both the happiest and unhappiest of mortals.”

When Lucy returns and announces she’s back, and leans against his piano, Schroeder resumes playing once again. Further, he often shows that he does appreciate it when she takes some interest in him, and his interest. Some time’s he’ll  catch on, and see that she’s just trying to impress him, as is the case in one strip, from December of 1968 when she tells him an idea for a party they could all have in honor of Beethoven’s birthday. She suggests a big gathering where all the boys bring nice presents for the pretty girls, and upon receiving and opening the presents the girls would show their affection to the boys. Schroeder replies,

“Tomorrow is Beethoven’s Birthday…I am going to celebrate his birthday by playing his Sonata in A Flat Major, Opus 110, and sitting in silent meditation for one minute… by myself.”

Lucy, rejected once again rescinds the idea, seeing Beethoven’s birthday as just another Monday. Other times, Schroeder will seem to play her game of hypothetical’s and speculate about a marriage, but only to raise his own standard. For what he would look for in a potential wife. In one strip from January 1967 he tells Lucy,

“One of Beethoven’s favorite dishes was macaroni and cheese. The girl I marry must be able to make a good macaroni and cheese.”

While it may seem to today’s readers that this was a simple request and then leave them stunned by how intimidated Lucy seems, Beethoven’s’ Macaroni and cheese was not the Kraft easy Mac purchased in a supermarket with noodles and powdered cheese. This is more of a fine dining experience, as the style the composer would have eaten would have to be cooked in salt water for ten minutes, and seasoned with pepper and butter, and the cheese itself, was Grana  Padano, was a fine Italian cheese. Perhaps Lucy does know this, as her reply is to ask if Beethoven would have been fine with cold cereal.

However, on one occasion, Schroeder does show affection towards Lucy and appreciate her gestures. Once, for Beethoven’s birthday she makes him a cupcake with a candle in honor of Beethoven in a strip from December of 1984. Schroeder is delighted by the gift and that she remembered. Then, Schroeder gives her a kiss on the cheek. However, by the time Lucy opens her eyes, Schroeder has already started to head back to his piano, and Snoopy is standing in his place, leading her to believe that the dog gave her a kiss, and sending her spiraling into her usual rant about “poisoned dog lips.”

While he may laugh at Charlie Brown’s failed tree in A Charlie Brown Christmas, and occasionally deride Charlie Brown for his failings as a manager, Schroder is one of Charlie’s closest friends. In fact in Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown as he passes out Valentines, he encourages Charlie Brown, letting him know that he’ll make sure Charlie gets a card when he finds one for him. He is also apologetic to him when he doesn’t find one in the box.

Finally at the end of the special he goes to visit him. That is when the girls from the class come to see him and all of them are feeling bad about how Charlie didn’t get a card. As a gesture of kindness, Violet erases her name from one of her cards and, accompanied by the other girls in class, goes to offer it to Charlie. That is when Schroeder lets into them, saying,

“Hold on there! What are you doing? Who do you think you are? Where were you yesterday when everyone else was giving out Valentines? Is kindness and thoughtfulness something you can make retroactive? You and your friends are the most thoughtless bunch I have ever known. You don’t care about Charlie Brown, you just hate to feel guilty! And now you have the nerve to come back next day and offer him a used Valentine! Well, let me tell you something, Charlie Brown doesn’t need…”

Charlie interrupts his tirade to accept the offer, later admitting to Linus that he did probably let Schroeder down. This would be one of the many instances when Schroeder would demonstrate that after Linus, he was probably one of Charlie’s most consistent friends. The two of them, as pitcher and catcher would often discuss baseball strategy together, and would deal with Lucy’s annoyances on the field together. Aside from Linus, few in their neighborhood know just how difficult she could be.

While Schroeder may not speak much in the strips and specials, he continually demonstrates consistency, patience and dedication whether as the catcher, playing his piano, or standing up for Charlie Brown. After all, as any musician knows, that is what it takes to be a great artist.It certainly pays off as he is often the go to guy to provide music for the parties that the gang may throw.

When he does speak, it will always be an impassioned speech, with the same fire as the composer he strives to emulate. Further, his passion is so fierce that while he may appreciate when Lucy occasional shows interest in Beethoven he is not above calling her out when she just wants gifts, not realizing the beauty or majesty of the music that the great maestro left behind, making him the only person to stand up to her and leave her speechless. As he tells her in one strip ,dated December 15, 1975,

“I’m not going to buy you anything! You know why? Because you don’t care anything about Beethoven! You never have! You don’t care that he suffered! You don’t care that his stomach hurt and that he couldn’t hear! You never cared that the Countess turned him down, or that Therese married the Baron instead of him, or that Lobkowitz stopped his annuity!!”

 

 

 

Bibliography:

TV SPECIAL: Beall, Andy and Frank Molieri. Happiness is a Warm Blanket, Charlie Brown. Starring  Austin Lux , Amanda Pace, Trenton Rogers, Grace Rolek, Shane Baumel, Blesst Bowden, Ciara Bravo, And Pessoa, and Andy Beall. Charles M. Schulz, Craig SHulz, and Stephan Pastis ( writers). Charles M Schulz Creative Consultants/WildBrain Animation Studios/ Warner Bros. Home Video . 2011.

Donat, Misha. “Beethoven’s Immortal Beloved.” The Guardian. Guardian News and Media, 11 June 2004. Web. 07 Mar. 2017.

Duncann, Geraldine. “Beethoven’s “Mac ‘n” Cheese”.” The Questing Feast.com. N.p., 2008. Web. 07 Mar. 2017.

Conradt, Stacy,” 10 Things We Learned from The Q&A with Charles Schulz’s Wife”Mental Floss January 3, 2014. Archived. Last Accessed March 7, 2017.

Ng, David “New Concert Hall in Sonoma Named for “Peanuts” Character.”Los Angeles Times. August 11, 2014. Archived online .Last Accessed March 7, 2017.

Kaufman, James C. “The Charlie Brown Theory of Personality” Psychology Today. March 3, 2010. Archived. Last Accessed: November 17, 2016.

TV SPECIAL: Melendez, Bill (Dir.) A Charlie Brown Christmas. Starring Peter Robbins, Chris Shea, Tracy Stratford, Kathy Steinberg, Chris Doran, Karen Mendelson, Geoffrey Orstein, Sally Dryer, Anne Altieri, and Bill Melendez. Charles M. Schulz (Writer.)Lee Mendelson/Bill Melendez Productions/United Features Syndicate.  1965.

“Beethoven’s Mac & Cheese.” Philharmonic Society.org. Philharmonic Society of Orange County, 28 Dec. 2011. Web. 7 Mar. 2017.

Popova, Maria. “Immortal Beloved: Beethoven’s Passionate Love Letters.” Brain Pickings. Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, 15 Mar. 2016. Web. 07 Mar. 2017.

TV SPECIAL: Roman, Phil ( Dir). Be My Valentine, Charlie Brown. Starring Duncan Watson, Stephen Shea, Melanie Kohn,  Greg Felton, Lynn Mortensen, Linda Ercoli, and Bill Melendez. Charles M. Schulz (Writer.) Lee Mendelson/Bill Melendez Productions/United Features Syndicate.  1975.

TV SPECIAL: Roman, Phil (Dir.) Is This Good-bye, Charlie Brown? Starring Brad Kesten, Jeremy Schoenberg, Angela Lee, Stacy Heather Tolkin, Kevin Brando, Victoria Vargas, Michael Dockery, and Bill Melendez. Charles M. Schulz ( Writer).Charles M .Schulz Creative Associates.1983.

Schulz, Charles M. My Life With Charlie Brown. Pg. 148. 2010. Schulz Family Intellectual Property. University Press of Mississippi.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 30th May, 1951. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 11th May, 1966. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 31st January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 12th December, 1968. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 20th January, 1969. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 21st January, 1969. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 22nd January, 1969. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 23rd January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 1st February, 1969. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 24th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 25th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 27th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 28th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 29th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 25th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 30th January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 31st January, 1967. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 16th May, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 18th May, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 28th May, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 2nd October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 3rd October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 4th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 5th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 8th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 9th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 10th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 11th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 12th October, 1974. Web. 8 March, 2017.

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 5th December, 1975. Web. 8 March, 2017.

 

Schulz, Charles M. “Peanuts.” Peanuts.com. Peanuts Worldwide,LLC Appeared on: 27th Oct 2016 / This comic’s first appearance: 16th December, 1984. Web. 8 March, 2017.

PHOTO CREDIT:

1966. Lee Mendelson/Bill Melendez Productions/United Features Syndicate.

Disclaimer:

This blog is not authorized, endorsed, approved or affiliated with Lee Mendelson/Bill Melendez Productions/United Features Syndicate, Paramount Pictures, Warner Bros. 20th Century Fox, Blue Sky Studios, Peanuts Worldwide or any other parties involved in the creation, development, and ownership of the Peanuts characters. The views and opinions in this blog are strictly those of it’s author, and do not reflect the views or ownership of the respected owners of Peanuts.

Advertisements

About jonathondsvendsen

Hi! Thanks for stopping by my blog! Somehow you stumbled upon it. Whatever brought you around, I'm glad you're here. I am a free-lance writer and independent scholar of pop-cultural mythology, living and working in Minnesota. An aspiring mythmaker, I dream of voyages through space, fantastic worlds, and even my own superhero or two. I am also an established public speaker and have guest-lectured for college classes on the topic of comic book superheroes. I graduated from Bethel University in 2007 with a degree in Literature and Creative writing. I also write for the website NarniaFans.com. Head on over and you can check out my book reviews , a few fun interviews and even my April Fools Day jokes.
This entry was posted in Comic Strips and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s